Common Dog Grooming Myths

Top 10 Dog Grooming Myths

  1. Don’t wash your dog unless it’s filthy

Ever hear that frequent bathing is bad for dogs? It might have been true once, but that was when shampoos weren’t formulated specifically for dogs’ needs. Choose the right shampoo for your dog and your dog can have a bath every day!

 

  1. Poodles and their crossbreeds won’t trigger allergies

This idea is pretty new (and untrue). Poodles and other single-coat breeds shed less than others so if crossbred, you get a dander-free dog! Sadly, this won’t necessarily prevent you from having allergies. Also, it’s not just dander that is causing allergic reactions. Talk to your doctor if allergies worry you.

 

  1. Lamb + Rice = Healthy Coat

A while back owners were looking for allergy-alleviating diets. Vets prescribed lamb together with rice, a new combo for dogs’ menus. Everyone called it a miracle cure and of course businesses love selling miracle cures to clamoring customers. Unfortunately, many dogs developed allergies to this diet, too.

 

  1. Pooch been skunk’d? Use tomato juice!

Skunks release a number of compounds called thiols. They’re the chemicals responsible for making rotting meat and doggie poop stink. Tomato juice doesn’t actually do anything in this case; it’s just your brain getting used to the prolonged exposure to the thiols.

 

  1. Dogs can’t help halitosis

False! You shouldn’t need to hold your breath every time your dog poops. If you always need a gas mask because of the stench, it can be a sign of serious trouble. Cavities, gum infections – even oral cancer could be the cause, so check with the vet.

 

  1. Raw egg = Healthy coat

Eggs are bursting with protein, vitamins, and minerals, so, once in a while, a raw egg isn’t bad. However, it would be best to cook it – raw whites can cause hair loss and other symptoms due to biotin deficiency. Cooked eggs are fine but a healthy, balanced diet would be of more benefit.

 

  1. Dogs never need shaving

Almost true. Sometimes there is a real need to shave. Some breeds need regular grooming. Sometimes hair gets hopelessly tangled. Health problems might necessitate shaving. Just remember that you’re basically removing your dog’s natural protection against the elements, so prepare clothes for warm/cold weather and a decent sunscreen.

 

  1. De-flea using garlic and brewer’s yeast

Another myth, scientists actually use brewer’s yeast to grow fleas, so despite the minor benefits of the vitamins inherent to yeast, it’s probably not a good idea to use it. Garlic is also not helpful against fleas. Just use proven topical or oral products.

 

  1. Don’t use shampoos made for humans

Again, partly true. Human products aren’t designed with dog skin pH levels in mind. Using them regularly will dry out your dog’s coat. If you have nothing else on hand, then it’s not going to be a problem as a one-off as long as you rinse thoroughly and it’s not a prescription shampoo.

 

  1. Doggie slobber is less of a bacteria farm than human saliva

You must have heard someone say this while watching a dog licking someone’s wound. While for the most part dog saliva isn’t a vector of human diseases, the bacteria present in it is just as likely as anything else to cause infection.